The world is a vast, amazing place filled with different cultures and ethnicity’s. Local vendors are not allowed on the beach. You will find them selling their wares at specific gift huts at each resort. Items like leather and shell bracelets, canvas paintings, hand-painted silk sarongs, colourful cotton dresses, wooden sculptures, and more were paraded for sale. Some items were well prices while others were expensive. travel insurance Usually I like to haggle while shopping wherever I go, but in Cuba, I felt the people made so little money to begin with, I just bought things at the price told to me. If you love shopping, unfortunately your thrill will not be quenched here. There was just enough selection to pass perhaps thirty minutes browsing. What you saw was what there was. Still, it was nice to see the culture displayed in artistic wares.

Every morning the resort’s staff cleared away the overnight seaweed washed in, swept up the trekked in sand on the wooden walkways and dusted off the kicked up sand on the blue, beach loungers. These loungers were then placed in neat rows to await the new day’s sun worshipers. What a beautiful sight that was to see the row after row of loungers on an empty beach. Around 1PM every afternoon, a waiter walks the long beach taking drink orders. Wildlife lovers can elect to take safari-type tours in this area. In the wintertime, some of those tours are by sleigh rides in the snow! The National Elk Refuge, 1.9 miles from the center of the city, attracts herds of elk in the autumn and winter months. Always be proactive and book a car so that even friends and family can also travel along. Standard shift is the common kinds of vehicles that you will find in Greece. Moreover, if you wish to go to far off places, you will have to stick to public transport like buses and taxis.

This country has not caught up with our hygiene standards and besides this, with our daughter not being fully immunised against the diseases in their country it was quite off-putting seeing hands reaching out to touch her constantly. The Vietnamese don’t seem to mean any harm in doing this though, it’s almost like you’re walking down the street with a celebrity when you’re with your baby and it’s not enough to say “Hello”, they’ve actually got to touch! Some people will see you coming and start to shout “Baby!” to alert their friends nearby. My husband and I seemed almost invisible, they paid us no attention for being foreigners, just our baby. One lady tried to wheel my pram over to her friends when I stood still for just a moment, and many got out their mobile phone and took photos of her. They do not ask permission. I don’t quite understand why, but both the men and women, hotel and customs staff, everyone, everywhere you go will do this.