People mostly travel for fun, but have you ever thought about traveling on your own? Most of my time in Nepal will be during the rainy-or monsoon-season, when many of the country’s unpaved roads are impassable. So I expect I’ll be doing a lot of walking (trekking, that is), which is more than fine with me. I hope to explore as much as possible on foot. A simple strategy to cut costs is to avoid the most popular places. For instance, a European city like Paris can be so expensive, but there are other great alternatives that can be just as charming, such as Athens and Budapest. Alternatively, a trip to Costa Rica is typically quite pricey, but a neighboring country like Nicaragua may be a more attractive option. I know lots of people who have been to Nepal ( lots of my friends are keen walkers)- sadly I’m not one of them. I wish you ll the best for this great experience. Great lens.

The tour and travel package should be scheduled as per the season; popular seasons include mid-June to late August. If less crowded time is preferred, then don’t hesitate in booking the Greece package somewhere around autumn or spring; this will surely help in escaping commercialization. One word about the passport – I always take mine with me, even when traveling within the United States. The reason I do that is that the passport provides an additional piece of information, and that is important in the event your wallet is lost or stolen while on vacation. Since it is impossible to board a plane these days without id, having an extra form of id with you can make your life a lot easier. My book is about an epic journey that began in Melbourne and traveling 4000 km’s on dirt roads and tracks to the the RED CENTER ( Ayers Rock ) and on to Perth in Western Australia.

First, thanks for nominating my lens for LOTD. I enjoyed this lens and shared your adventure. We were just in Penang and stayed at the Eastern and Oriental and you should see it now. It is truly magnificent. The bar is still the original so you’ll still recognize traces of the hotel’s history. Ok, so Bon Jovi didn’t send us his private plane to get to his concert, but my friend Angie and I did buy tickets travel insurance on a small commercial airplane to zip down to St. Louis for the show. We live about two hours north of St. Louis, and I have discovered that taking the commercial plane is the way to go. My round-trip ticket was about $99. Yes, that is more than gas would cost, but we saved a hefty parking fee at the hotel. Plus, we did not have to deal with St. Louis traffic on a day when Bon Jovi was in town.